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Unity clarifies ToS changes, welcomes back “unsupported” SpatialOS

Enlarge Days after a nasty public split with cloud gaming developer Improbable, Unity has reinstated the company’s license and updated its own terms of service to offer what it is calling a “commitment to being an open platform.” “When you make a game with Unity, you own the content and you should have the right to put it wherever you want,” Unity wrote in a blog post explaining the move. “Our TOS didn’t reflect this principle—something that is not in line with who we are.” The new terms of service allow Unity developers to integrate any third-party service into their projects, no questions asked. As a caveat, though, Unity will now distinguish between “supported” third-party services—those Unity ensures will “always [run] well on the latest version of our software”—and “unsupported” third-party services, which developers use at their own risk….

Worlds Adrift and other MMOs safe as Unity and Improbable dispute ends

The past week’s flurry of accusations, counter-claims, big-money deals and license revocations between Unity and Improbable seems to have come to an end. Developers using Improbable’s SpatialOS cloud server tech can breathe easy, and resume development as normal without fear of the floor dropping out under them. In a Unity blog post here, the company say they’ve reinstated Improbable’s Unity licenses, and have altered the terms of service so that they are no longer in breach. Developers are now free to use any third-party services they wish, although not all will be officially supported. (more…)

Dead Game

Click for full size Nothing much else to say about Artifact expect perhaps to write it’s an obituary. My opinion is, outside of being a paid game in a market saturated with F2P options, the game is made toward a single person, and JUST that kind of person. It lacks brain dead aggro decks, or super gimmick control deck, they are this snowbally mid-range deck where you don’t really have full control of the board. Or perhaps the game is just bad, with how little control you have of where your units attack and how you need to keep tabs of multiple stuff, the reason why so many people keep saying the game is mentally taxing, like playing chess with invisible pieces. I just wish Valve had used its resources to make a 2d platformer game instead, I’d love…

ULX3S: An Open-Source Lattice ECP5 FPGA PCB

The hackers over at Radiona.org, a Zagreb Makerspace, have been hard at work designing the ULX3S, an open-source development board for LATTICE ECP5 FPGAs. This board might help make 2019 the Year of the Hacker FPGA, whose occurrence has been predicted once again after not quite materializing in 2018. Even a quick look at the board and the open-source development surrounding it hints that this time might be different. Bottom side of ULX3S PCBThe ULX3S was developed primarily as an educational tool for undergraduate-level digital logic classes. As such, it falls into the “kitchen sink” category of FPGA boards, which include a comprehensive suite of peripherals and devices for development, as opposed to more bare-bones FPGA breakouts. The board includes 32 MB SDRAM, WiFi via an ESP-32 (supporting over-the-air update), a connector for an SPI OLED display, USB, HDMI, a microSD…

DIY Arduino based RC transmitter

  Dejan over at HowToMechatronics posted a detailed how-to on building DIY Arduino RC transmitter: Now I can wirelessly control any Arduino project with just some small adjustments at the receiver side. This transmitter can be also used as any commercial RC transmitter for controlling RC toys, cars, drones and so on. For that purpose it just needs a simple Arduino receiver which then generates the appropriate signals for controlling those commercial RC devices. I will explain how everything works in this video through few examples of controlling an Arduino robot car, controlling the Arduino Ant Robot from my previous video and controlling a brushless DC motor using an ESC and some servo motors. More details on HowToMechatronics’ project page. Check out the video after the break.

Homemade Odroid-go Compatible Game Console

An introduction video about my homemade Odroid-go can be found here. A full demonstration of the steps can be viewed in this youtube link Odroid-Go is a great invention from hardkernel. It can function as a game console with many emulators. Though the no. of emulators is only a small portion of thos…By: cheungbxContinue Reading »

Web Development: What’s Big In 2019?

I try to keep up with web development trends but it’s hard to keep pace since it’s such a fast evolving field. Barely a week goes by without the release of a new JS framework, elaborate build tool or testing suite — all of them touted as the one to learn. Sorting the hype from the genuinely useful is no mean feat, so my aim in this article is to summarise some of the most interesting happenings that web development saw in the last year, and what trends we expect to see more of in 2019. A technology or framework doesn’t have to be brand new to be on our list here, it just needs to be growing rapidly or evolving in an interesting way. Let’s take a look! Looking Back on 2018: SPA,  CSS Grid, and Speed Single Page Applications…

Looking Ahead to 2019: WordPress in the Year to Come

What a year! At the end of 2017, I remember thinking that the previous year had been one of the biggest when it came to change in WordPress. But I didn’t know what was in store for 2018!2018 has seen some of the most fundamental and farthest-reaching changes in WordPress since its inception, embodied by the Gutenberg plugin (and the row over it).But in my view, it’s not Gutenberg that will dominate 2019—it’s the changes it heralds.So let’s take a look at what 2019 might have in store for WordPress and its community of users and developers.The WordPress CodebaseGutenberg represents the beginning of a fundamental shift in the WordPress codebase.Remember Matt Mullenweg’s State of the Word 2015 (yes, it was that long ago), when he told everyone to “learn JavaScript, deeply”?Well, now is the time when those people who listened to him will…

GitHub Free Users Now Get Unlimited Private Repositories

GitHub has always offered free accounts, but users were forced to make their code public. To get private repositories, you had to pay. Now, as TechCrunch reports, “Free GitHub users now get unlimited private projects with up to three collaborators.” From the report: The amount of collaborators is really the only limitation here and there’s no change to how the service handles public repositories, which can still have unlimited collaborators. This feels like a sign of goodwill on behalf of Microsoft, which closed its acquisition of GitHub last October, with former Xamarin CEO Nat Friedman taking over as GitHub’s CEO. Talking about teams, GitHub also today announced that it is changing the name of the GitHub Developer suite to ‘GitHub Pro.’ The company says it’s doing so in order to “help developers better identify the tools they need.” But what’s maybe…